Eye Injuries

Eye Injuries

Each day, more than 2,000 U.S. workers receive some form of medical treatment because of eye injuries sustained at work, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports. If you are among these workers, you should be eligible to receive workers’ compensation benefits.

However, the benefits process is never automatic. There are many ways a workers’ compensation claim can be unjustly delayed, reduced or denied despite a worker’s obvious injury.

At Frank M. Eidson, P.A., we are committed to helping you if you are experiencing any difficulties with your claim for medical benefits and/or lost-wage benefits. Contact us todayfor a free case review. We serve clients throughout Orlando and central Florida.

What are Eye Injuries?

Most eye injuries result from small particles or objects striking or abrading the eye. These may be metal slivers, wood chips, dust or cement chips that are ejected by tools, blown by the wind or fall from above a worker. A nail, staple or sharp sliver of wood or metal that penetrates the eyeball could cause a permanent loss of vision. An eye injury may also be caused by:

  • Blunt force trauma to the eyeball or eye socket
  • Splashes of industrial chemicals or cleaning products
  • Thermal burns or
  • Infectious diseases.

Why Do Eye Injuries Happen on the Job in Florida?

A National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) survey found that in 70 percent of cases, workplace eye injuries are caused by contact with an object or equipment. Nearly a quarter of cases involve exposure to harmful substances or environments. Injury sources include:

  • Scrap, waste, debris
  • Chemicals or chemical products
  • Person, plants, animals and minerals
  • Parts and materials
  • Welding torches.

Who is At Risk of Eye Injuries at Work?

The Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) requires workers to use eye and face protection when they are exposed to hazards such as:

  • Flying objects
  • Molten metal
  • Liquid chemicals
  • Acids or caustic liquids
  • Chemical gases or vapors
  • Potentially injurious light radiation.

Eye and face protection includes protective equipment such as spectacles, goggles, face shields or welding shields.

Workers in a factory or on a construction site are at risk of eye injuries from flying debris getting in their eyes or causing blunt force trauma to their eyes. Welders, their assistants and nearby workers are at risk of UV radiation burns (welder’s flash), which can injure their eyes and surrounding tissue.

Health care workers, laboratory staff, janitorial workers, animal handlers, and other workers may be at risk of acquiring infectious diseases through eye (ocular) exposure, NIOSH says.

How Can a Florida Workers’ Compensation Lawyer Help with Your Eye Injury?

The prevalence of eye injuries in the workplace and the existence of OSHA standards for eye and face protection indicate the seriousness of the risk of an occupational eye injury.

Experienced worker’s compensation attorney Frank M. Eidson, P.A., can make sure your employer takes your job-related eye injury seriously, too, and does not keep you from obtaining the full amount of workers’ compensation benefits.

We have more than 25 years of experience with workers’ compensation cases in central Florida. We know the tricks and tactics that insurers and employers use to try to deny or reduce valid claims. We’ll stand up for your rights.

If someone other than your employer is responsible for your injury, we can also pursue a third-party injury claim on your behalf.

Get in touch with us today to learn more and arrange for a free consultation about your case.

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