Orlando Single-Car Accidents

Single-car collisions can lead to serious and expensive injuries. However, when there is no other driver to blame, it may leave you wondering if you have any way to recover for your losses. Fortunately, Florida law provides options for victims of single-car accidents.

For example, Frank M. Eidson, P.A., assisted a client who collided with two livestock animals on a rural road at night. We helped the client to take action against the homeowner who had let a retaining fence to fall into disrepair, which allowed the cows to get out and present a hazard to drivers.

Contact us today to schedule a free evaluation of your case. Our firm can assist you in understanding how to proceed in a single-vehicle accident case. We serve clients in Orlando, Winter Park and communities throughout Central Florida.

How Do Single-Car Accidents Happen in Florida?

Single vehicle accidents broadly refer to all collisions in which there was only one car involved instead of multiple vehicles. These accidents can occur when drivers:

  • Take curves too fast and lose control of the vehicle
  • Strike a fixed object such as a highway median, parked car, tree or wall
  • Hit an animal such as a pet, deer or, as pointed out above, a livestock animal.

These collisions can be just as serious as accidents involving multiple vehicles. They can leave you with injuries that make working impossible and that are costly to treat, or they can leave you coping with the death of a loved one.

Establishing a Single-Vehicle Accident Claim

The options available to you for recovering compensation after a single-vehicle accident may include:

  • Suing the car manufacturer – If a defect in the vehicle served as the cause of your accident, you may be able to take legal action against the company that made the car as well as any distributor and retailer involved with the sale of the car. There have been many high-profile cases where accidents were caused by defective vehicles, from cars accelerating on their own to tire treads that fall apart.
  • Suing the agency that designed or maintained the road – Government agencies that are responsible for road design and maintenance have an obligation to exercise reasonable care. If the agency falls short, it is possible to take legal action. Because of government immunity rules limiting when you can sue a local, state or federal agency, you should speak with a car accident attorney if you believe a road defect was the cause of your collision.
  • Suing the animal owner – If your accident is caused by either hitting an animal or swerving to avoid hitting it, the owner of that animal may be held liable if the owner’s negligence allowed it to roam free and present a danger to drivers.
  • Filing a workers’ compensation claim – If your accident occurred while you were on the job, you may be able to pursue a workers’ compensation claim. Workers’ compensation benefits can cover the cost of medical treatment and provide disability income on a temporary or permanent basis.
  • Making a claim with your own insurer – The state of Florida has no-fault insurance rules. This means that every driver is required to buy a minimum of $10,000 of personal injury protection (PIP). No matter who was at fault for an accident, your coverage should pay for your medical treatment costs and partial lost wages up to the limits of your policy.

Contact an Orlando Car Accident Lawyer Today

All of the above options can make it possible for drivers in single-vehicle wrecks to be compensated for their losses. Of course, if you were a passenger in a single-vehicle accident, and the driver of the car was to blame, you can pursue a typical car accident damage claim against that driver. His or her insurance will pay the bills, so you should not feel guilty about making a claim against a friend or neighbor in such cases.

To learn more about your options, contact Frank M. Eidson, P.A., today. We will be ready to provide a free review of your case and get you started on the path to just relief.

Sources / More Information

Florida Traffic Crash Facts, Florida Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles